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Steak-Umm's Loses Copyright Case vs. Steak 'Em Up

Loser meat.
Loser meat.
Photo: Gourmet Male

A federal judge ruled in favor of Philly's Steak 'Em Up mini-chain, who was being sued for copyright infringement by the Steak-umm company. Gene Gagliardi, "inventor" of the Steak-umm (the frozen DIY version of Philly's famous sandwich), said he developed the product when he decided the beef used in the original was too tough for consumption.

During the proceedings, though, the truth behind Steak-umm's brown brick was revealed, and it appears to be just as bad as Eater obsession pink slime.

"In his ruling, Judge Lawrence Stengel describes it as made "from chopped and formed emulsified meat product that is comprised of beef trimmings left over after an animal is slaughtered and all of the primary cuts, such as tenderloin, filet, and rib eye, are removed. The emulsified meat is pressed into a loaf and sliced, frozen and packaged."

"I thought it was a joke because being from South Philly, the last thing I wanted to be was associated with Steak-umm," said Michael Lane, owner of Steak 'Em Up. For the record, Steak 'Em Up's cheesesteaks are pretty good, and their commercials are the crown jewel of local Philly TV spots.

Gagliardi wasn't as enthralled by the court's decision, adding, "He did no justice to the meat world!" Gagliardi is also credited with inventing popcorn chicken, another food that's based on deep frying unused trimmings from quality meat products.

"They were trying to bully me and they messed with the wrong guy," added Lane, who wins our True Philadelphian Award today, as his lawyer was concerned he might "curse too much on the stand."

· Steak-hmm [Philly.com]
· Steak-umm [Official]
· All Pink Slime Coverage [~EN~]

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