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A Guide to Uncommon Meats in Philly

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12355134111232008_10_hasmaps%20%283%29%20%281%29%20%281%29.jpgWith the amount of great chefs populating our city, it's no surprise that you'll see more than a few dishes that could challenge some palates by making use of less-familiar game meats and "leftover" parts. As we wind down our Five Days of Meat, Eater Philly has compiled a list of spots offering up creative takes on the "nasty bits" that you might not see every day.

In this list, you won't find any simple steaks, beef Wellington, or coq au vin. Instead, let's try to channel our inner Andrew Zimmerns and eat something a little less common from an animal that doesn't cross our plates every day. Maybe you'll even end up finding a new favorite.
— Dan McKay


· All Five Days of Meat Coverage [-EPHI-]

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Watkins Drinkery

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While plenty of bars are happy to lean heavily on crowd-pleasing chicken, the menu at Watkins aims a good bit higher — you're far more likely to run into venison and duck here. They excel at swapping out the old standby proteins with more varied options, while retaining approachable forms: try the wild boar sloppy joes or a burrito stuffed with rabbit. [Photo: Two Eat Philly]

Southwark

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Plenty of people might resist eating heart that has been cooked, so it takes a brave eater willing to eat it raw. For those so inclined, Southwark's beef heart tartare offers an opportunity to try the organ in its simplest form. (You'll find it on their late-night menu.)

Czerw's Kielbasa

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Fans of Bizarre Foods might be familiar with Czerw's Kielbasy from the show's visit to the family-owned sausage shop in 2011. For those trying to match the digestive courage of Andrew Zimmern, Czerw's kiszka (say "keesh'-ka") - a sausage made with pig's blood and liver - presents a formidable challenge. [Photo: Yelp]

Los Taquitos De Puebla

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A traditional Mexican taqueria located in the Philly's Italian Market, Los Taquitos de Puebla serves up some pretty great Mexican fare. For the ambitious eater, their menu features several cuts of beef from the head including tongue and mouth tacos. The beef eye tacos are worth a try - even if it's because of a dare. [Photo: Midtown Lunch]

Nan Zhou Hand Drawn Noodle House

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Chinatown, of course, is a hotbed of restaurants that enthusiastically embrace offal and lesser-known cuts of meat, especially if you find yourself ordering off the untranslated menu. Nan Zhou has several dishes that are built around these under-used animal parts, including sliced intestine soup. [Photo: Nan Zhou Noodle House]

Eulogy Belgian Tavern

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Although Eulogy is probably best known for their extensive beer selection, with over 300 domestic and international options, they also have a kitchen serving up some pretty great food. Their Sausage Trio, which rotates seasonally, currently features venison, boar, and duck varieties. [Photo: Food Spotting]

Penrose Diner

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Scrapple is such a breakfast staple for anyone raised around here, it's easy to forget how extreme it seems to many out-of-towners. Uncommon or no, it fits the offal bill and we couldn't resist sneaking in a rec: the Penrose Diner is one of the best places to enjoy it in the Philly area. [Photo: Yelp]

Scoop DeVille

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Given the ubiquity of bacon, it's no surprise at all to see the stuff weasel its way further and further into the dessert realm. One of Philly's most over-the-top examples is Scoop Deville's Country Breakfast ice cream, a house-made blend of butter pecan ice cream, maple syrup, and bacon bits - all topped with Golden Grahams cereal. [Photo:Yelp]

D'Angelo Bros. Meat Market

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For the adventurous cook, D'Angelo Brothers butcher shop in the Italian Market is your choice for hard to find game meat and sausage - you can even make your own custom sausage mix as long as you are willing to purchase five pounds. Choices like antelope, eland, and kangaroo could make for one seriously difficult Iron Chef-style secret ingredient. [Photo: D'Angelo Brothers ]

Watkins Drinkery

While plenty of bars are happy to lean heavily on crowd-pleasing chicken, the menu at Watkins aims a good bit higher — you're far more likely to run into venison and duck here. They excel at swapping out the old standby proteins with more varied options, while retaining approachable forms: try the wild boar sloppy joes or a burrito stuffed with rabbit. [Photo: Two Eat Philly]

Southwark

Plenty of people might resist eating heart that has been cooked, so it takes a brave eater willing to eat it raw. For those so inclined, Southwark's beef heart tartare offers an opportunity to try the organ in its simplest form. (You'll find it on their late-night menu.)

Czerw's Kielbasa

Fans of Bizarre Foods might be familiar with Czerw's Kielbasy from the show's visit to the family-owned sausage shop in 2011. For those trying to match the digestive courage of Andrew Zimmern, Czerw's kiszka (say "keesh'-ka") - a sausage made with pig's blood and liver - presents a formidable challenge. [Photo: Yelp]

Los Taquitos De Puebla

A traditional Mexican taqueria located in the Philly's Italian Market, Los Taquitos de Puebla serves up some pretty great Mexican fare. For the ambitious eater, their menu features several cuts of beef from the head including tongue and mouth tacos. The beef eye tacos are worth a try - even if it's because of a dare. [Photo: Midtown Lunch]

Nan Zhou Hand Drawn Noodle House

Chinatown, of course, is a hotbed of restaurants that enthusiastically embrace offal and lesser-known cuts of meat, especially if you find yourself ordering off the untranslated menu. Nan Zhou has several dishes that are built around these under-used animal parts, including sliced intestine soup. [Photo: Nan Zhou Noodle House]

Eulogy Belgian Tavern

Although Eulogy is probably best known for their extensive beer selection, with over 300 domestic and international options, they also have a kitchen serving up some pretty great food. Their Sausage Trio, which rotates seasonally, currently features venison, boar, and duck varieties. [Photo: Food Spotting]

Penrose Diner

Scrapple is such a breakfast staple for anyone raised around here, it's easy to forget how extreme it seems to many out-of-towners. Uncommon or no, it fits the offal bill and we couldn't resist sneaking in a rec: the Penrose Diner is one of the best places to enjoy it in the Philly area. [Photo: Yelp]

Scoop DeVille

Given the ubiquity of bacon, it's no surprise at all to see the stuff weasel its way further and further into the dessert realm. One of Philly's most over-the-top examples is Scoop Deville's Country Breakfast ice cream, a house-made blend of butter pecan ice cream, maple syrup, and bacon bits - all topped with Golden Grahams cereal. [Photo:Yelp]

D'Angelo Bros. Meat Market

For the adventurous cook, D'Angelo Brothers butcher shop in the Italian Market is your choice for hard to find game meat and sausage - you can even make your own custom sausage mix as long as you are willing to purchase five pounds. Choices like antelope, eland, and kangaroo could make for one seriously difficult Iron Chef-style secret ingredient. [Photo: D'Angelo Brothers ]

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