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Go to These Eight Places for Mojitos in Philly

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It's hard not to love the mojito, in all their refreshing, sweet, fresh and fizzy glory, and despite gaining popularity in Philly more than five years ago, they're still showing strong on many of the city's more festive drink lists. The classic Cuban cocktail contains just six ingredients -- white rum, muddled mint, fresh lime, ice, simple syrup and a splash of club soda -- though, nowadays, bartenders play around with fruit flavors, bitters and a bevy of base spirits.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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Alma De Cuba

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As one of Philadelphia’s most enduring and elegant Cuban restaurants, Alma de Cuba keeps its mojito menu restrained. Three options deliver subtle differences, with the Classico using Bacardi Superior and the Suave using Bacardi Limon. El Jefe calls in the captain with local favorite Sailor Jerry rum and adds a bite with bitters (as does the Classico). The Suave goes down easy with a simple combination of rum, lime, simple syrup and mint.

Cantina Los Caballitos

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Fans can’t seem to settle on a favorite flavor here, and why should they? Though purists can stick with a glass or pitcher of the standard style, drinkers looking to add a little more of a tropical punch can try a different fruit addition every day for almost two weeks. You might say the choices -- tangerine, prickly pear, blood orange, strawberry, passion fruit, mango, raspberry, watermelon, pineapple, guava or melon -- might even make you a little loopy.

Copabanana

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Tuesday’s the day to come here for mojitos, given you can drink them at half price from 4 pm-10 pm. Bring three friends and you can sample all of them, from the Miami mojito (a hurricane glass filled with fresh mint, fresh lime, rum, cane sugar and club soda), to coconut, orange mango essence and watermelon (in season).

Cuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar

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Old City’s most vibrant Cuban bar and restaurant mixes up what appears to be the largest selection of mojitos in the city, served by the glass or pitcher. A list more than two-dozen long spans the classic to the high-end to the fruit-flavored to the nouveau. What’s nouveau, you ask? How about a mojito with white whiskey, gin, tequila or no booze at all.

Devil's Alley

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The selection is narrow but the ingredients in the raspberry mojito aren’t: Don Q Limon rum from Puerto Rico, raspberry puree, muddled mint, lime and a splash of soda. Order by the glass or pitcher.

El Vez

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Drinkers rave about the guava mojito at the fun Mexican-inspired hotspot. Bartenders use fresh natural pink guava puree to make it, along with Bacardi, Cruzan guava rum and of course, fresh lime and mint.

Mixto Restaurant

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Mixto earns high marks for its mojitos, which come in a staggering 20 flavors and three sizes. There’s the classic, obviously, which you can sample for $5 during happy hour every weekday from 4:30-6:30 p.m. But have you ever tried one made from jalapeno, peach, cucumber, basil, or pomegranate? And if you want something completely off the reservation, try the Tanqueray gin version.

North Third Restaurant

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What makes the mojito martini a mojito martini? Why, the glass, of course. Bartenders jazz up the drink by pouring it into a martini glass, though they’ll happily serve it classic-style on the rocks. The Bacardi Limon makes it a touch sweeter.

Alma De Cuba

As one of Philadelphia’s most enduring and elegant Cuban restaurants, Alma de Cuba keeps its mojito menu restrained. Three options deliver subtle differences, with the Classico using Bacardi Superior and the Suave using Bacardi Limon. El Jefe calls in the captain with local favorite Sailor Jerry rum and adds a bite with bitters (as does the Classico). The Suave goes down easy with a simple combination of rum, lime, simple syrup and mint.

Cantina Los Caballitos

Fans can’t seem to settle on a favorite flavor here, and why should they? Though purists can stick with a glass or pitcher of the standard style, drinkers looking to add a little more of a tropical punch can try a different fruit addition every day for almost two weeks. You might say the choices -- tangerine, prickly pear, blood orange, strawberry, passion fruit, mango, raspberry, watermelon, pineapple, guava or melon -- might even make you a little loopy.

Copabanana

Tuesday’s the day to come here for mojitos, given you can drink them at half price from 4 pm-10 pm. Bring three friends and you can sample all of them, from the Miami mojito (a hurricane glass filled with fresh mint, fresh lime, rum, cane sugar and club soda), to coconut, orange mango essence and watermelon (in season).

Cuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar

Old City’s most vibrant Cuban bar and restaurant mixes up what appears to be the largest selection of mojitos in the city, served by the glass or pitcher. A list more than two-dozen long spans the classic to the high-end to the fruit-flavored to the nouveau. What’s nouveau, you ask? How about a mojito with white whiskey, gin, tequila or no booze at all.

Devil's Alley

The selection is narrow but the ingredients in the raspberry mojito aren’t: Don Q Limon rum from Puerto Rico, raspberry puree, muddled mint, lime and a splash of soda. Order by the glass or pitcher.

El Vez

Drinkers rave about the guava mojito at the fun Mexican-inspired hotspot. Bartenders use fresh natural pink guava puree to make it, along with Bacardi, Cruzan guava rum and of course, fresh lime and mint.

Mixto Restaurant

Mixto earns high marks for its mojitos, which come in a staggering 20 flavors and three sizes. There’s the classic, obviously, which you can sample for $5 during happy hour every weekday from 4:30-6:30 p.m. But have you ever tried one made from jalapeno, peach, cucumber, basil, or pomegranate? And if you want something completely off the reservation, try the Tanqueray gin version.

North Third Restaurant

What makes the mojito martini a mojito martini? Why, the glass, of course. Bartenders jazz up the drink by pouring it into a martini glass, though they’ll happily serve it classic-style on the rocks. The Bacardi Limon makes it a touch sweeter.

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