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Every Philadelphia Restaurant Marcus Samuelsson Visits on ‘No Passport Required’

Where to find Neapolitan pizza, cannoli, lasagna, Italian cheeses, and more

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Most Italian Americans came from southern Italy and settled in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, which has the second-largest Italian population in the United States. Today, Italian Americans who stayed in South Philly have built on generations of Italian-run businesses — there are Italian shops, private clubs, bakeries, and restaurants that have been operated by the same families for close to a century, if not longer. But there are also Italian Americans who are exploring their heritage and culinary traditions in different ways, experimenting with dishes, local Pennsylvanian ingredients, and the parts of their cuisine that mean the most to them.

Watch “Philadelphia” from Season 2 of No Passport Required, hosted by chef Marcus Samuelsson, here. And in this map, find the places Samuelsson visits in the episode.

Note: Since filming, Paradiso and Tre Scalini have closed.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Le Virtu

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1927 Passyunk Ave
Philadelphia, PA 19148
(215) 271-5626
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Francis Cratil-Cretarola and Cathy Lee’s restaurant Le Virtu serves a menu rooted in cuisine from Abruzzo, a region in southern Italy. In this episode, chef Damon Menapace makes taccozzelle — a pork sausage ragu with mushrooms, black truffle, and saffron — with Samuelsson.

2. Termini Bros Bakery

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1523 S 8th St
Philadelphia, PA 19147
(215) 334-1816
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The Termini family takes pride in their bakery, opened in 1921, and their recipes, which have been used for three generations. They call the recipes a “living tradition.” Samuelsson learns how to make the bakery’s signature ricotta cannoli, which has a special ingredient: red wine in the cannoli dough.

building with sign that says termini pastries

3. Palizzi Social Club

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1408 S 12th St
Philadelphia, PA 19147

At the members-only Palizzi Social Club, Samuelsson and president Joey Baldino cook brasciole — short rib filled with breadcrumbs and lardo, then rolled and sliced — and try a traditional stewed tripe.

red neon sign that says filippo palizzi club

4. Di Bruno Bros.

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930 S 9th St
Philadelphia, PA 19147
(215) 922-2876
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For 80 years, Di Bruno Bros. has been serving up cheese, olives, cured meats, antipasti, and other Italian goods to hungry shoppers in the heart of Philly’s historic Italian Market. Samuelsson samples cave-aged pecorino and anchovies, then tours the entire Italian Market.

storefront that says du bruno bros since 1939

5. Ralph's Italian Restaurant

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760 S 9th St
Philadelphia, PA 19147
(215) 627-6011
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Opened in 1900, Ralph’s is widely considered the oldest Italian restaurant in the country. With the Rubino family, Samuelsson makes lasagna, veal parmesan, and — of course — the classic Italian gravy.

sign that says ralph’s italian restaurant

6. Vetri Cucina

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1312 Spruce St
Philadelphia, PA 19107
(215) 732-3478
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At Vetri, Samuelsson mills flour and learns about how different flours can make a “revolutionary” difference in Italian cuisine. With chef and owner Marc Vetri, he makes a few pasta shapes, including a rolled pasta called trofie, which they eat with pistachio pesto and orange zest. They also make “old-school” meatballs with the chef’s father, Sal Vetri.

sign that says vetri with 1312 underneath

7. Spuntino Wood Fired Pizzeria

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701 N 2nd St
Philadelphia, PA 19123
(267) 930-8486
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Chef and co-owner Salvatore Carollo is a fourth-generation pizza maker. His restaurant, Spuntino, focuses on Neapolitan pies, a specific style of pizza that has earned UNESCO World Heritage status. Pizzas cook for 60 to 75 seconds at a minimum of 900 degrees in a wood-burning oven.

sign that says spuntino

1. Le Virtu

1927 Passyunk Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19148

Francis Cratil-Cretarola and Cathy Lee’s restaurant Le Virtu serves a menu rooted in cuisine from Abruzzo, a region in southern Italy. In this episode, chef Damon Menapace makes taccozzelle — a pork sausage ragu with mushrooms, black truffle, and saffron — with Samuelsson.

1927 Passyunk Ave
Philadelphia, PA 19148

2. Termini Bros Bakery

1523 S 8th St, Philadelphia, PA 19147
building with sign that says termini pastries

The Termini family takes pride in their bakery, opened in 1921, and their recipes, which have been used for three generations. They call the recipes a “living tradition.” Samuelsson learns how to make the bakery’s signature ricotta cannoli, which has a special ingredient: red wine in the cannoli dough.

1523 S 8th St
Philadelphia, PA 19147

3. Palizzi Social Club

1408 S 12th St, Philadelphia, PA 19147
red neon sign that says filippo palizzi club

At the members-only Palizzi Social Club, Samuelsson and president Joey Baldino cook brasciole — short rib filled with breadcrumbs and lardo, then rolled and sliced — and try a traditional stewed tripe.

1408 S 12th St
Philadelphia, PA 19147

4. Di Bruno Bros.

930 S 9th St, Philadelphia, PA 19147
storefront that says du bruno bros since 1939

For 80 years, Di Bruno Bros. has been serving up cheese, olives, cured meats, antipasti, and other Italian goods to hungry shoppers in the heart of Philly’s historic Italian Market. Samuelsson samples cave-aged pecorino and anchovies, then tours the entire Italian Market.

930 S 9th St
Philadelphia, PA 19147

5. Ralph's Italian Restaurant

760 S 9th St, Philadelphia, PA 19147
sign that says ralph’s italian restaurant

Opened in 1900, Ralph’s is widely considered the oldest Italian restaurant in the country. With the Rubino family, Samuelsson makes lasagna, veal parmesan, and — of course — the classic Italian gravy.

760 S 9th St
Philadelphia, PA 19147

6. Vetri Cucina

1312 Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA 19107
sign that says vetri with 1312 underneath

At Vetri, Samuelsson mills flour and learns about how different flours can make a “revolutionary” difference in Italian cuisine. With chef and owner Marc Vetri, he makes a few pasta shapes, including a rolled pasta called trofie, which they eat with pistachio pesto and orange zest. They also make “old-school” meatballs with the chef’s father, Sal Vetri.

1312 Spruce St
Philadelphia, PA 19107

7. Spuntino Wood Fired Pizzeria

701 N 2nd St, Philadelphia, PA 19123
sign that says spuntino

Chef and co-owner Salvatore Carollo is a fourth-generation pizza maker. His restaurant, Spuntino, focuses on Neapolitan pies, a specific style of pizza that has earned UNESCO World Heritage status. Pizzas cook for 60 to 75 seconds at a minimum of 900 degrees in a wood-burning oven.

701 N 2nd St
Philadelphia, PA 19123

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